Search This Blog

Loading...

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Despite what one might think...

...blowing smoke up each other's asses is not a sacramental.

But it sure is popular among Catholics these days, even among smart people: Exhibit MCLXIV

I saw this on Facebook, and naturally The Scourge sent it with a triumphal, sarcastic fluorish.

It's good news for the people appointed to it, to be sure. But the derisive hoots, which seem to be on the order of "See--the Pope's on an orthodox roll here, lol haters F1 rulz!" are...embarrassing.

In reality, it is the equivalent of being told, after a horrible candidate is elected governor: "Look at these awesome selectmen who won!"

I guess if it makes you feel better, great. Just remember that the purpose of the ITC is to advise the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith. And Pope Francis is determined to reduce that Congregation's role.

So a golfer you like won something on the Senior Tour, or a race car driver smoked someone in the Busch Series. Great--but it's not the big time. It's not where the action is. It's going to matter much, much less under this pontificate than it would have back in January 2013.

I'm not sure that's all that great a consolation prize for the Chicago faithful, but you can try it on them. 

I know which I'd rather have. I know which one is far more relevant, even with respect to those who don't live in Chicago. And it isn't the composition of the ITC. 

For the origins of the delightful "blowing smoke" phrase, go here.

2 comments:

  1. I remember the days I didn't have to brace myself before reading a Pathos article.

    I'd say it's good politics to assign people to "advisor" roles but really... it's not. Good politics is to know what actions could be considered scandalous, and to make them carefully. And really, I've seen no evidence of that in the past year.

    ReplyDelete
  2. William said, "I remember the days..."

    If you want to have some fun, go back three years and read old entries from the mainstream Catholic bloggers. Now compare with today. The change in emphasis is remarkable.

    ReplyDelete